GambleAware launches problem gambling treatment survey

By Iqbal Johal

Gambling harm prevention charity GambleAware has announced the commission of its second Annual GB Treatment and Support Demand Survey.

The survey, which YouGov will conduct, is designed to determine the barriers, take up and demand for problem gambling treatment and support in Great Britain, for those affected by either their own or someone else’s gambling.

It will run alongside three other commissioned surveys with each using identical survey questions on gambling behaviour, harms, barriers and facilitators to accessing treatment methods.

The sample size has been increased to 18,000, from 12,000 in 2019, to allow for a better comparison of differences between geographical regions on a smaller scale, which will include an increased sample of ethnic minority communities.

The charity will report key findings by age, gender, ethnicity, and geography, to highlight the main differences between certain groups.

Alongside the annual survey, GambleAware has commissioned Yonda to run an additional quota survey, and NatCen and Kantar to each head a random probability survey, making it possible to compare survey responses to assess different methodologies.

GambleAware said: “The results of the surveys will be compared and will contribute to a better understanding of how to most effectively estimate the shape and size of gambling harms across Great Britain alongside a clearer view of the barriers and demand for treatment across the country.”

Survey results will be released next spring.

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