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KSA investigates potential match-fixing

A full letter on the results of the investigation will be posted on the KSA website. 

KSA investigates potential match fixing
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The Dutch Gaming Authority (KSA) has begun an investigation into possible match-fixing risks across the market. The investigation is pointed towards sports betting and amateur clubs like the Toto KNVB Cup, with the KSA stating that ‘Gambling providers that offer bets on sports matches are not allowed to do so for just any match.’ 

The KSA describes match-fixing as ‘if the result of a sporting competition is fully or partially determined by a participant (player, trainer or referee) who deliberately loses or cheats. This can lead to, for example, bribery, fraud, tax fraud and money laundering.’ 

Various providers gave information regarding several amateur teams, offering identification and analysis to the KSA. Finding that bets had been placed on amateur teams, the KSA commented that ‘this identification and analysis requires significant improvement.’ 

The results concluded that providers have been dealing with match-fixing obligations differently, sometimes outsourcing the identification and analysis of Toto KNVB Cup matches partially or even completely. Similarly, the level of analysis provided by operators has also been shown to differ, with some operators providing extensive analysis while others only provide single sentences. 

Finally, the investigation concluded that not every provider is taking the same measures against betting manipulation, which may result in heightened match-fixing risks.  

The penalty for the discovery of match-fixing can be severe, depending on the duration, severity and body dictating the outcome. Earlier this week it was reported that Bulgarian tennis official Stefan Milanov would face a 16-year suspension from attending or officiating tennis events authorised by the International Tennis Integrity Agency (ITIA) after the agency found Milanov to be guilty of 17 breaches of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program. 

Alongside the ban, Milanov was fined $75,000.

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